Garonne (garonne) wrote in linguaphiles,
Garonne
garonne
linguaphiles

definition of weeknight

What does the English word 'weeknight' mean to you?

The word 'weekday' means Mon, Tues, Wed, Thurs and Fri. That's clear.

According the dictionary.com, 'weeknight' means 'any night of the week, usually except Saturday and Sunday'. According to Miriam- Webster, it's 'a weekday night', with weekday defined as above. So it's Mon-Fri nights.

But I've just realised I always use it to mean Mon-Thurs nights, or Sun-Thurs nights, not Mon-Fri nights. As in:

"I don't go out on weeknights, because I have to work the next day."

Anyone else using it like that? And if not, can you think of some other expression for Sun-Thurs nights?

There's also "school nights", which does mean Sun-Thurs nights, but I've never liked using that except for schoolchildren.
Tags: english, vocabulary
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