mha_chan (mha_chan) wrote in linguaphiles,
mha_chan
mha_chan
linguaphiles

Help with a word that -might- be Hebrew. Or Yiddish. Or who even knows.

My friend is transcribing an interview about our city's (Newcastle, UK) Orthodox Jewish community for work, and she's utterly stumped by this bit:

Ok, I am totally stumped by this... "So each person probably has to make their own, what we call <XX> - meaning their own kind of calculation""



The <XX> sounds like "hedge bah," with the first consonant being an uvular fricative. I've been googling all the Hewbrewesque spelling variations I can think of and I'm drawing a blank. Trying to google a word with the meaning "meaning" is proving very tough as well.


I appreciate this is an impossible ask, but if anyone has any clue at all, we'd appreciate it!

I'm not sure if she could give me the audio - confidentiality of interviewee I think..
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  • UDDER and WATER

    To the memory of Vladislav Illich-Svitych. This is just to bring attention to something very ‘Nostratic’ (far beyond ‘Indo-European’ languages —…

  • Three one-hundredths of a second

    (Somewhat prompted by watching the Olympics.) Why is that silly redundancy there in "three one-hundredths of a second"? Nobody says "two one-thirds…

  • Word 'Climax'. A note for aspiring etymologists.

    The English word climax has two seemingly incompatible meanings of "climax" and "orgasm". Yet, we should not forget that the word has not only a…