dorsetgirl (dorsetgirl) wrote in linguaphiles,
dorsetgirl
dorsetgirl
linguaphiles

Meaning of insult in (presumably Argentinian?) Spanish

.
Can anybody tell me what "pecho frío" means? Google translate says "chest cold". My minimal knowledge of Spanish leads me to think it's more likely to be "cold chest", but what I'm really after is how is it used? From context it seems to be derogatory, but I can't work out what the person is actually being accused of, and how bad it is.

Context: Argentinian tennis player Juan Martín del Potro has apparently announced that he will not be playing the Davis Cup this year, in order to concentrate on his own career. Some people don't like this and are calling him a "pecho frío".

Would it be something like "cold-hearted" as in "hard, selfish, doesn't care"?

And, just out of curiosity, is it a globally-understood Spanish expression? Or is it South American? Or perhaps Argentinian only?

Thanks!
Tags: idioms, south america, spanish
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