oh you (seasontoseason) wrote in linguaphiles,
oh you
seasontoseason
linguaphiles

french phrase

there is a bakery I visited called "le petit outre." I can't decide if it is meant to mean something like "the little [one] besides / moreover" or something more like "the little [one] outrages." Or perhaps something else altogether? I actually dug to the point of finding a patent application for this bakery on which it is claimed that the proper translation is "THE LITTLE OUTRAGEOUS" or "THE LITTLE FAR BEYOND." But this doesn't satisfy me as these are barely meaningful phrases in English (perhaps "the little outrage" would be more appropriate?). Is this some sort of super hard to translate idiom in French or did the patent clerk just do a shoddy translation job? Halp, French speakers!
Tags: french
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  • French: Inversion in French questions, first person singular

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