klausnick/莫罗佐夫·尼科莱/профан (klausnick) wrote in linguaphiles,
klausnick/莫罗佐夫·尼科莱/профан
klausnick
linguaphiles

neal

In A Hand-book of Anglo-Saxon Rootwords there is a list of words under the heading The human body; Seeing.

Red, yellow, blue, white, black, dark, wan, green, brown, gray, dun, coal, flint, gold, gall, silver, glass, brass, brimstone, ash, sallow, radish, ruddy, swan, fair, foam, welkin, roach, tidy, blank, bright, look, blink, seek, stare, dye, neal, bleach, glaze, brand, reck, show, glisten, rust, glitter, twinkle, snow, frost, dew, lightning.

I cannot understand the word (a verb?) neal.

Tags: english
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