dorsetgirl (dorsetgirl) wrote in linguaphiles,
dorsetgirl
dorsetgirl
linguaphiles

Use of "has closed" in American English

Today's "Official Google Blog" has confused me quite a lot. At the beginning of the second paragraph is the statement

"...I’m excited to announce today that our Motorola Mobility deal has closed."

My first thought was - that's an odd thing to get excited about. I carried on reading, looking for an explanation of (a) why Google were no longer dealing with Motorola and (b) why this was exciting. I didn't find one. Having reached the bottom, still in great puzzlement, I finally realised that I'd missed the title: "We’ve acquired Motorola Mobility". Which is presumably exciting.

So my questions:

(1) Do other speakers of British English find this an odd way to phrase this announcement? Did/would you read it as something having ended?

(2) For speakers of American English - is this a standard phrasing? Does the word "closed" ever mean "ended", or does it always mean "signed and sealed"?
Tags: american english, english
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