Morgan D. (morgan_d) wrote in linguaphiles,
Morgan D.
morgan_d
linguaphiles

Interpreting the word "share"

Hi! I'm translating a fantasy novel by a Canadian author. In the following excerpt, Kelley and Tyff, who share an apartment in New York, deal with having a horse (actually a kelpie) unexpectedly appearing in their bathtub:

"Look, I called the city's Animal Control but they wouldn't believe me." Kelley went to the bathroom door and opened it. The horse stood there, fetlock deep in scented water, chewing placidly on the corner of a bath towel. "I think the lady who took my call thought I might be smoking something."

"If you are..." Tyff glowered, "considering the circumstances, you’d better share."


I'm not entirely sure about what Tyff means by "share" here. Does she mean, "If you're doing drugs, I want you to tell me" or "This situation is so bizarre, I need to be high too"?

ANSWERED. Big thanks to everybody who replied. You've all been very helpful.
Tags: english, translation&interpreting
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