Guillermo (bluebeard) wrote in linguaphiles,
Guillermo
bluebeard
linguaphiles

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polish sibilants

So, uh, I have a favour to ask our Polish speakers.

If you have means to record yourself (i.e. microphone, etc.), would it be possible for you to make time (whenever you have it, lol) to pronounce as naturally as possible (i.e. not overly careful, but not unnaturally fast) words that contrast solely (or almost) by their sibilants? That is to say, minimal pairs or near-minimal pairs. Wikipedia has some pretty good sound files on Polish words with the sibilants, but listening to them individually doesn't seem to help me much, lol. I want to see if I can (over time, with enough practice) learn to distinguish and make them to the best of my ability.

Anyways, please record Polish words which have the following (and, ideally, only contrast by these sounds, or any other sound plus one of these).

IPA: /ts dz tʂ dʐ tɕ dʑ s z ʂ ʐ ɕ ʑ/

written Polish: c, dz, cz, dż, ć/ci, dź/dzi, s, z, sz, ż/rz, ś/si, ź/zi

example: sum vs. szum, etc. but they don't have to be real words. that is, say you have "mysz" (let's assume this isn't a word in Polish, even though it is) and "myś" (which definitely isn't a Polish word, according to the dictionary, but it could be [i.e. it's not un-Polish-sounding], and that's the point).

*shrug* This might seem silly since I'll probably never live in Poland or need to make this distinction, but it's a personal goal for me; I take pride in this kind of thing, i.e. being able to pronounce names and stuff that ain't in my native language/languages I actually speak. :] Plus it'll help me with the conlang I'm working on (just for fun; with the exception of Quenya I think learning a conlang is totally ridiculous and useless when there's real awesome languages like Polish that one could learn), which, while not based directly on Polish does have a significant amount of Polish influence (mostly phonological and lexical).

P.S. Vocaroo is the best recorder program/site I can think of. It'll keep your recording for a few days, but afterwards it'll disappear, and you don't have to make an account to record stuff. I find that recording yourself on the computer and then uploading it wherever is just wayyy too much work/hassle.

P.P.S. If you speak another Slavic language that has ALL of these sibilants as well feel free to help out. The ones whose phonology I know a little about (i.e. Slovenian) don't seem to have them, but maybe another one does? (I don't have time to check Wikipedia rn lol).
Tags: howdoyousayallthewordsinyourlanguage, phonetics, phonology, polish
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