Millions of strange shadows does she attend on (rare_fandom) wrote in linguaphiles,
Millions of strange shadows does she attend on
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linguaphiles

Help With A Latin Poem

So I was reading fic earlier and one quoted two lines from a poem written in Latin. Using google I was able to find the entire poem, but not a translation into English, so I was wondering if someone could help me.

The poem is by a man named Seneca, sent to his friend Crispus. It goes:

Crispe, meae vires, lassarumque ancora rerum
Crispe, vel antiquo conspiciende foro,
Crispe potens numquam, nisi cum prodesse volebas
Naufragio litus tutaque terra meo
solus honor nobis, arx et tutissima nobis
et nunc afflicto sola quies animo
Crispe, fides dulcis tplacidiquet acerrima uirtus
cuius cecropio pectora melle madent
maxima facundo vel avo vel gloria patri
quo solo careat si quis, in exilio est:
An tua, qui iaceo saxis telluris adhaerens,
Mens mecum est, nulla quae cohibetur humo ?
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  • 12 comments

  • UDDER and WATER

    To the memory of Vladislav Illich-Svitych. This is just to bring attention to something very ‘Nostratic’ (far beyond ‘Indo-European’ languages —…

  • Three one-hundredths of a second

    (Somewhat prompted by watching the Olympics.) Why is that silly redundancy there in "three one-hundredths of a second"? Nobody says "two one-thirds…

  • EUROPA, etymology

    "... Agenor, king of the Phoenician city of Sidon, had a beautiful daughter Europa, literally (in Greek) the "wide-eyed". In fact, of course, not…