Alex (electricdruid) wrote in linguaphiles,
Alex
electricdruid
linguaphiles

  • Mood:

You've got your work cut out for you!

Today my mother informed me that "You've got your work cut out for you" does NOT mean that you've got an easy job ahead of you. Until today, when I heard it used the way she explained in a TV show, I've never in my life (ok, I'm only 21 but still) heard the phrase used to mean that you actually have a difficult task ahead of you. And yet a quick google seems to show me that this is exactly what it means.

Can anyone offer any suggestions as to why everyone I know may have been using it to mean that one actually has an easy task ahead of them? Or have I just been completely misinterpreting things for the past 20 years? :(
Tags: english, idioms
Subscribe

  • Are these symbols Korean or Japanese?

    This was in the garage of a house we moved into. The previous owner had been stationed in Korea and had visited Japan. Would anybody know what…

  • 諦める and 諦めがつく

    Is there a difference between 諦める and 諦めがつく?

  • グズグズ meaning

    I am having trouble understanding what "グズグズ" means in this sentence: あのグズグズだった頃の俺の心がお前となぁなぁになる事をまだ許していないのは確かだ Could someone explain?

  • Post a new comment

    Error

    Anonymous comments are disabled in this journal

    default userpic

    Your reply will be screened

    Your IP address will be recorded 

  • 33 comments
Previous
← Ctrl ← Alt
Next
Ctrl → Alt →
Previous
← Ctrl ← Alt
Next
Ctrl → Alt →

  • Are these symbols Korean or Japanese?

    This was in the garage of a house we moved into. The previous owner had been stationed in Korea and had visited Japan. Would anybody know what…

  • 諦める and 諦めがつく

    Is there a difference between 諦める and 諦めがつく?

  • グズグズ meaning

    I am having trouble understanding what "グズグズ" means in this sentence: あのグズグズだった頃の俺の心がお前となぁなぁになる事をまだ許していないのは確かだ Could someone explain?