gitl_eli7 (gitl_eli7) wrote in linguaphiles,
gitl_eli7
gitl_eli7
linguaphiles

"Belgian Waffles"

Hi.  I don't know if this was discussed before, so please let me know if it was.  I was wondering what kind of place names are used for things (food and other) in different places in the world.  Like for example, in the US, there's French toast, Belgian waffles, etc.

Here in Israel we have:

גלידה אמריקאית = "Glida Amerikayit" = American Icecream = soft serve icecream
וופל אמריקאי = "Waffle Amerikai" = Waffle
חסה ערבית = "Hasa Aravit" = Arabic Lettuce = Romaine lettuce
קוביה הונגרית = "Kubia Hungarit" = Hungarian Cube = Rubix Cube
סכין יפנית = "Sakin Yapani" = Japanese knife = X-acto knife

My flatmate just got back from Greece, where she ate a lot of Greek salad, which in Hebrew is "salat yevani", which literally means "Greek salad".  Any Greeks out there to tell me what it's called in Greek?

I'm curious as to what these things as well as others are called in other countries.  Thanks!
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  • UDDER and WATER

    To the memory of Vladislav Illich-Svitych. This is just to bring attention to something very ‘Nostratic’ (far beyond ‘Indo-European’ languages —…

  • Three one-hundredths of a second

    (Somewhat prompted by watching the Olympics.) Why is that silly redundancy there in "three one-hundredths of a second"? Nobody says "two one-thirds…

  • Word 'Climax'. A note for aspiring etymologists.

    The English word climax has two seemingly incompatible meanings of "climax" and "orgasm". Yet, we should not forget that the word has not only a…