Anonymous (ulvesang) wrote in linguaphiles,
Anonymous
ulvesang
linguaphiles

Peripheral English /ç/

I've noticed that I produce [ç] when pronouncing (a very few) certain words-- always marked by the digraph ch-- such as in Murdoch, loch (not so uncommon a pronunciation), and lichen. I don't believe it is universal among English sepakers, because I've been made fun of for it (namely the third example). Of course, then, I'd like to vindicate myself and prove that I'm not just weird.

Is this some sort of orthographic/foreign-loanword-ish hypercorrection, or does /ç/ actually occur in some modern English dialects/idiolects?-- other than, conservative versions of e.g. Scots, I mean.

EDIT: I am an idiot: loch and Murdoch have [x] (although lichen does have [ç])
Tags: english, phonology
Subscribe

  • The Australian Vernacular... Mate

    Here's an article about Australian slang words, tacked onto a story about an ex-pat USA citizen grappling with what looks & sounds to be the base…

  • translations of the Bhagavad Gita

    An old friend was talking with C and me lately, and she expressed an interest in learning more about the ideas behind yoga, and particularly about…

  • Why say Sunday Blues?

    When you can use a German-derived term that Germans speakers themselves probably don't use

  • Post a new comment

    Error

    Anonymous comments are disabled in this journal

    default userpic

    Your reply will be screened

    Your IP address will be recorded 

  • 19 comments

  • The Australian Vernacular... Mate

    Here's an article about Australian slang words, tacked onto a story about an ex-pat USA citizen grappling with what looks & sounds to be the base…

  • translations of the Bhagavad Gita

    An old friend was talking with C and me lately, and she expressed an interest in learning more about the ideas behind yoga, and particularly about…

  • Why say Sunday Blues?

    When you can use a German-derived term that Germans speakers themselves probably don't use