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English context question; an article about Google

Hello Linguaphiles!

I'd like to ask you something about the following passage.

Google is the standard-bearer for a wide-open world of Web standards in which programmers should be able to run nearly any software on almost any computing device. From Google's perspective, the more the merrier - so long as those programs, devices, and Web sites create places for Google to sell online ads.

1) What is the standard-bearer for a wide-open world of Web standards
2) The 2nd line, 'the more the merrier' .... is that mean the more they have those contents, the merrier they get because they'll be able to get more online ads? Could some of you explain it in more flat way for me? Thank you so much in advance!
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  • UDDER and WATER

    To the memory of Vladislav Illich-Svitych. This is just to bring attention to something very ‘Nostratic’ (far beyond ‘Indo-European’ languages —…

  • EUROPA, etymology

    "... Agenor, king of the Phoenician city of Sidon, had a beautiful daughter Europa, literally (in Greek) the "wide-eyed". In fact, of course, not…

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    The English word climax has two seemingly incompatible meanings of "climax" and "orgasm". Yet, we should not forget that the word has not only a…