Juliet (julietaldy) wrote in linguaphiles,
Juliet
julietaldy
linguaphiles

Any thoughts on the etymology of "panéed"?

My mom is from New Orleans, very cajun, and an excellent cook.  One of her best dishes is called "Panéed Chicken" (chicken coated in a mix of breadcrumbs and parmesan cheese, then fried in olive oil and butter) and I've always wondered where the word comes from.  Obviously its etymology lies mostly in French, so I'm thinking this may be a bit of Cajun French.  Does anyone know anything about the dialect or this word?  (A google search will show that it's usage is fairly commonly used, as will a trip to NOLA).

Here's my rough idea, with absolutely no research done to back this up, but it popped into my head and so I thought I'd share....

Paner
in French is "to coat with breadcrumbs," so the past participle is pané, with an extra "e" for the feminie form, which would be used to agree with chicken.  That all makes perfect sense.  So, did the "d" get attached as a transfer from English grammar, which adds "ed" as a past participle?  Or is there some other reason for that "d'?

Very speculative, I know, but just a thought.
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