Технік-радіольщик Мокроголовенко (hector_von_kyiv) wrote in linguaphiles,
Технік-радіольщик Мокроголовенко
hector_von_kyiv
linguaphiles

uncountable veggies

In Ukrainian, certain names of vegetables are uncountable nouns. For example: капуста (cabbage), картопля (potato), морква (carrot) and more. We say "Я не їм картоплі" ("I don't eat potatoes"; in fact, "potato" is in singular) or "Покласти капусту в борщ" ("Put cabbages into borsch;" again, in singular). It is, however, possible to say "1,2,3... капустини / картоплини / морквини"; that suffix makes the nouns countable, but this is used only when you have to specify the exact number of vegetables. On the other hand, огірок (cucumber) помідор (tomato) баклажан (aubergine) and some others are always countable. Most kinds of fruit are countable as well, but виноград (grapes) is uncountable. (It is much like that in Russian and, perhaps, in some other Slavic tongues).

Is there a phenomenon like this in any other languages? I mean referring to things that naturally come in distinctly separate units/pieces with uncountable nouns.
Tags: ukrainian, vocabulary
Subscribe

Recent Posts from This Community

  • I guess basic is too basic.

    You have to love how slang evolves. In my day, insulting someone was dissing someone from the word disrespect. Now it is throwing shade, especially…

  • The Australian Vernacular... Mate

    Here's an article about Australian slang words, tacked onto a story about an ex-pat USA citizen grappling with what looks & sounds to be the base…

  • translations of the Bhagavad Gita

    An old friend was talking with C and me lately, and she expressed an interest in learning more about the ideas behind yoga, and particularly about…

  • Post a new comment

    Error

    Anonymous comments are disabled in this journal

    default userpic

    Your reply will be screened

    Your IP address will be recorded 

  • 28 comments

Recent Posts from This Community

  • I guess basic is too basic.

    You have to love how slang evolves. In my day, insulting someone was dissing someone from the word disrespect. Now it is throwing shade, especially…

  • The Australian Vernacular... Mate

    Here's an article about Australian slang words, tacked onto a story about an ex-pat USA citizen grappling with what looks & sounds to be the base…

  • translations of the Bhagavad Gita

    An old friend was talking with C and me lately, and she expressed an interest in learning more about the ideas behind yoga, and particularly about…