André (n_true) wrote in linguaphiles,
André
n_true
linguaphiles

Split Genitives / Split Possessives

I'm doing some research and am currently writing a paper on a language named Tsez, a Northeast Caucasian language spoken in Dagestan. I noticed something weird going on in the folklore texts I am glossing and wonder if this phenomenon occurs in other languages as well. I'm sure that German doesn't allow such constructions, but I believe I've seen this in Latin (not sure)...

It's about split genitives or split possessives, where a supposed NP with the head and the dependent is split up by something inbetween which is not part of the NP. See these examples for clarification (the names just mark the stories and sentences they appear in), where I have marked the supposed possessive NPs in bold:






[Fish.034]: "Дебер раьтиру шебинон рисно дебез ми эни-обийдаьгъор йикIи!"
deberrätirušebinonrisnodebezmieni–obiydäɣoryik’i
debe-rr-äti-rušebinonr-is-nodebe-zmieni–obiy-däɣory-ik’i-∅
you.OBL-DATIV-want.CONST-PSTPRTsomethingIV-take-PSTCVByou.OBL-GEN2youparents-APUD.VERSII-go-IMP

Translation: "Take whatever you want, then go to your parents!"




[Ring.020]: "Даьз жа цIакъ рокIаьва йисаь?"
däzžac’aq’rok’äwayisä
dä-zžac’aq’rok’u-ä-way-is-ä
me.OBL-GEN2he/she/itmuchheart-IN.ESS-QII-take-PSTWIT.INT

Translation: "Did she take me into her heart that much?"




[Stick.014]: "Дидив межус ди ужи одаь?"
didiwmežusdiužiodä
didiwmežu-sdiuži∅-odi-ä
whichy'all.OBL-GEN1mesonI-do-PSTWIT.INT

Translation: "How was your son and what did I make of him?" (sic!)




Explanations of the glosses:
I – IV = genders (male; female; non-humans; abstracta)
APUD.VERS = apud-versative case (~ "towards next to so./sth.")
CONST = constative stem (~ umlauted)
DAT = dative/lative case (also marks the subject of "want" here)
GEN1 = genitive case (with absolutive head nouns)
GEN2 = genitive case (with oblique head nouns)
IMP = imperative mood
IN.ESS = in-essive case (~ "inside sth.")
OBL = oblique stem
PSTCVB = past converb
PSTPRT = past participle
PSTWIT.INT = interogative suffix of past witnessed tense
Q = question clitic


Your opinion? Seen this anywhere else in any language? Is this "normal" behavior? Does this violate UG or something? ;)
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