kati (this_bugs_4_you) wrote in linguaphiles,
kati
this_bugs_4_you
linguaphiles

questions about studying interpretation

ok, first of all, i apologize to all, because i know there was another post about interpretation studies just a few days back.  but i promise i read it first to make sure it doesn't already answer my questions :)

i've recently started trying to investigate how one goes about becoming an interpreter.  (yes, i confess, i am starting with essentially zero knowledge).  i think i sort of figured i would find a degree program, go back to school, that sort of thing...but it's starting to seem more complicated!   almost like it's a secret to accomplish :)

i'm in buenos aires, and there is only one university here that offers a program in interpretation, and everyone says it's not that great.  there are a few private institutes that ARE well-respected, so i've started courses at one of those.  but i won't have a degree at the end, just my course certificate. 

so then i was looking at programs back in the states.  also, not a whole lot.  so, is there some secret here that i am missing?  is there another way to break into the field without a degree specifically in interpretation?

and on a related note, what do you think about taking classes in one language (in my case, i'd like to brush up on my french or russian, both of which need some serious work!) WHILE  taking this interpretation couse in a different language pair (eng<>sp)?  is that a recipe for disaster?

*i did also notice that is seems to be extremely competitive!   perhaps that's why everything is so secretive :).  
**i ALSO  noticed that people talking about the interpretation studies in europe know like 5 or 6 languages at a minimum, while the folks in the states often get by with just 2 or 3.  does that sound right to you guys?
Subscribe

  • UDDER and WATER

    To the memory of Vladislav Illich-Svitych. This is just to bring attention to something very ‘Nostratic’ (far beyond ‘Indo-European’ languages —…

  • Etymology for word LUNCH

    LUNCH - midday meal. Scholars explain its etymology as follows: 'Recorded since 1580; presumably short for luncheon, but earliest found also as…

  • Novgorodian birch bark in Finnish dialect, 11th Century

    Novgorodian birch bark in Finnish dialect, 11th Century - written in Cyrillic: 1. юмола нуолиінимижи Jumola nuolin imizhi EST: Jumal noolnud…

  • Post a new comment

    Error

    Anonymous comments are disabled in this journal

    default userpic

    Your reply will be screened

    Your IP address will be recorded 

  • 14 comments

  • UDDER and WATER

    To the memory of Vladislav Illich-Svitych. This is just to bring attention to something very ‘Nostratic’ (far beyond ‘Indo-European’ languages —…

  • Etymology for word LUNCH

    LUNCH - midday meal. Scholars explain its etymology as follows: 'Recorded since 1580; presumably short for luncheon, but earliest found also as…

  • Novgorodian birch bark in Finnish dialect, 11th Century

    Novgorodian birch bark in Finnish dialect, 11th Century - written in Cyrillic: 1. юмола нуолиінимижи Jumola nuolin imizhi EST: Jumal noolnud…