The Tick (shanrina) wrote in linguaphiles,
The Tick
shanrina
linguaphiles

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English plural question, jewelry in Hindi, and looking for book recs

1) Background: I just started a job as a K-12 tutor, and some of the kids I teach are unaware of some of the basics of grammar so I've been going over some of it. I came across something in a grammar/writing book that surprised me: the plural of buffalo. I'm a native speaker (American English), and I've always heard and said "buffalo" for more than one, but the book claimed that the plural was only "buffaloes." I looked it up in a dictionary, and it said that buffalo, buffalos, and buffaloes were all acceptable plurals. So, native English-speakers, which plural is common in your dialect?

2) I just realized I don't actually know the difference in the Hindi terms "kangana" and "chudiyan," both of which mean something along the lines of "bracelet." Can anyone explain the difference between the two?

3) I'm taking a Linguistics 101 class right now. The term paper assignment is to write a profile of a language of our choice and I chose Sanskrit. The problem is that the professor is being very specific about the guidelines, and he's set out a maximum number of sources. If I didn't have that maximum I'd be fine, but I'm having a hard time finding enough information in one single place about one section I'm planning for the paper: the section on efforts to promote the use of Sanskrit in modern times. Does anyone have any recommendations for books I can use that will talk about this in some detail? I've tried Google, the library website, and my local library and either I'm using the wrong search terms or there's nothing there.

Thanks for any help!
Tags: english, hindi, sanskrit
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