everyone's favourite magnum enthusiast (curlybeach) wrote in linguaphiles,
everyone's favourite magnum enthusiast
curlybeach
linguaphiles

General pondering for any speaker of English :)

Hey guys :)

I was just reading something on a community, and came across this construction of English, which grated on me a little:

'We got used pretty fast to the new look'

For me, it disrupts the meaning of the 'verb group' or 'verb contruction' to insert the adverbial 'pretty fast' in between 'got used' and 'to'. I mean, I know 'to' is a preposition which marks the start of the preposition phrase 'to the new look', but for me a much more natural (and if I'm honest, correct) sounding sentence would be 'We got used to the new look pretty fast'.

I was curious, would you as speakers of English use the former construction at all? I was wondering if it was a feature of a different kind of English. (I'm a native speaker of British English, by the way). Does the first construction bug you guys the way it bugs me? Feel free to tell me I'm being a fool if you would use the first construction all the time, and it's just me who phrases things oddly ^__^

Thanks!
Tags: english, grammar
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