Jen / Qua (quabazaa) wrote in linguaphiles,
Jen / Qua
quabazaa
linguaphiles

Free tests to gauge extent of vocab & proficiency?

Hi all, I looked through the tags and couldn't find this so apologies if someone has covered it already.

Could anyone recommend some decent sites which can test your vocab & proficiency in various languages?

Also I've always wondered how estimating of the extent of one's vocabulary really works? How is it decided? Are words of "known" frequency chosen and then matched to where you scored? What about for languages such as Arabic which I heard don't seem to have any type of official ranking/frequency list?

I'm especially interested in Spanish, Japanese, French and Arabic, but all other languages would be interesting to me. It would be more useful if at the end they give you a blurb about where you're at, rather than just a score out of 100.

Thanks! :)
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