gutentag1 (gutentag1) wrote in linguaphiles,
gutentag1
gutentag1
linguaphiles

 Perhaps someone here can help me out with something that I still can't seem to understand: the subjunctive mood/tense.  In my last Spanish class, we went over it, but I honestly don't understand it.  I was told that it is used a lot, so I really do need to understand when to use it.  In order to understand it, I also need to equate it to English, but I don't understand it in English either.

1.) The professor said it wasn't used much in English, but had a hard time coming up with examples.  She came up with one; "If I were a king, I would...."  Can you give me other examples of it in English because I don't really think I will be telling people what I would do if I were a king any time soon? 

2.) In order for it to be used so much in Spanish but not so much in English, how do I determine when to use it in Spanish when I wouldn't in English?  There must be a difference that I'm just not seeing or that's just not registering for me.

Thank you.

 
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    To the memory of Vladislav Illich-Svitych. This is just to bring attention to something very ‘Nostratic’ (far beyond ‘Indo-European’ languages —…

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