rhapsodyatdusk (rhapsodyatdusk) wrote in linguaphiles,
rhapsodyatdusk
rhapsodyatdusk
linguaphiles

Hemming and hawing (speech disfluency)

What sorts of hemming and hawing, discourse markers, fillers, and other instances of speech disfluency are observed in the language(s) you speak? In English, I can think of "um," "uh," and "like," to name a few. In Japanese, 「あの」 ("anou")、「えーと」 ("ehto") 、「まあ」 ("maa"). In French, I can think of "euh," and Wikipedia tells me also "quoi," "bah"/"ben," "tu vois," "eh bien."

1) I'm most curious about multi-syllabic instances of speech disfluency. Can you give me some examples in non-English languages and, if applicable, their corresponding English meanings (e.g., "tu vois" = "you see")?

2) Have you ever tried to avoid using fillers? Whether or not it's an effective method of presentation, I've read that job interviewees should try to avoid using fillers. What are your impressions of people who don't use many fillers--do they come across as articulate, or would their speech sound more "natural" and accessible if they were to use more fillers?

3) Do fillers such as "if I may," "if you will," "as it were," and "if you like" belong to a separate subcategory of fillers? Anyone else annoyed by them?
Subscribe

  • EUROPA, etymology

    "... Agenor, king of the Phoenician city of Sidon, had a beautiful daughter Europa, literally (in Greek) the "wide-eyed". In fact, of course, not…

  • Word 'Climax'. A note for aspiring etymologists.

    The English word climax has two seemingly incompatible meanings of "climax" and "orgasm". Yet, we should not forget that the word has not only a…

  • The extended etymology for Ego, Εγώ ( I )

    The Oxford Etymologic Dictionary (OED) considers Ego / I as if it were a self-standing word developed within the Germanic and 'Indo-European'…

  • Post a new comment

    Error

    Anonymous comments are disabled in this journal

    default userpic

    Your reply will be screened

    Your IP address will be recorded 

  • 58 comments
Previous
← Ctrl ← Alt
Next
Ctrl → Alt →
Previous
← Ctrl ← Alt
Next
Ctrl → Alt →

  • EUROPA, etymology

    "... Agenor, king of the Phoenician city of Sidon, had a beautiful daughter Europa, literally (in Greek) the "wide-eyed". In fact, of course, not…

  • Word 'Climax'. A note for aspiring etymologists.

    The English word climax has two seemingly incompatible meanings of "climax" and "orgasm". Yet, we should not forget that the word has not only a…

  • The extended etymology for Ego, Εγώ ( I )

    The Oxford Etymologic Dictionary (OED) considers Ego / I as if it were a self-standing word developed within the Germanic and 'Indo-European'…