Алина (germaniac_z) wrote in linguaphiles,
Алина
germaniac_z
linguaphiles

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Nicht zuletzt: hard to translate in this context...

I am trying to find an English equivalent for a strange german phrase. (It's from a novel.)

The context:
A student has just finished expressing some very radical ideas in a debate in History, and the impressed but sceptical teacher aproaches her after class and asks her, "Where did you get that from?"
Her answer, in German:
"Nicht zuletzt von Ihnen, ansonsten zusammengeklaubt im eigenen Kopf."

My attempts thusfar have made it to:
"Not laslty from you, otherwise gathered together in my own head."

Which sounds no better than Babelfish could have done. .
My problem is that I tend to translate too close to the original. That makes uncomprehensible, awkward sentences which are difficult to read and are lacking the human feel.

And besides, I am trying to get across what she means. 
I was thinking, "Well I could even have gotten it from you..." But that doesn't have quite the spark of intellect as the original.

Any ideas?
Tags: english, german, translation
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