__halfempty (__halfempty) wrote in linguaphiles,
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Japanese historical linguistics

I am in need of some help. Nothing too in-depth, just some book/article suggestions.

I'm taking a class called Development of Diachronic and Synchronic Linguistics. Basically, it covers historical linguistics, how views have changed, how it developed as a science and such (scholars we've discussed have included various Greeks, Herder, Jones, Rask, Grimm, Verner, Neogrammarians, Saussure, Sapir, etc). We are given a bit of freedom in choosing the topic for our final paper, so I'm leaning toward something dealing with Japanese historical linguistics. This can be from the point of view of the Japanese themselves or others' studies. In my class, we've discussed the interrelationship of languages, methodology, what a word is, etc., but it's mostly been focused on Indo-European and American Indian languages. Something similar about Japanese or from a Japanese perspective is what I'm interested in.

I haven't done a ton of very thorough searching yet, but from what I have done, I haven't found a great many sources. Most of the internet sources I've found haven't been scholarly, and my school library doesn't seem to have anything. Academic Search Premier didn't really give me anything, either. I still need to dig through all of the other online databases, but I wanted to see if any of you here have dealt with this topic and might have any suggestions for sources. I know there has to be stuff written about this--I just can't seem to find anything.

Thanks in advance!
Tags: japanese, linguistics
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