john (exentric) wrote in linguaphiles,
john
exentric
linguaphiles

  • Mood:
  • Music:

Infinitive Stuff.

In a recent syntax assignment, I've only just realized that the "to" in an English infinitive - i.e. to eat, to dance, to f$%k - is a free morpheme that represents (-tense) and is the head of the IP embedded in the outer CP.

So unless I've done this wrong, this should be correct:

"He wanted to kiss me."

Labeled Bracket Notation:
[IP[NP[(He)i]][I'[I[+pst[-ed]]][VP[V'[V[want]][CP[C'[C[ø]][IP[NP[i]][I'[I[(-tense)[to]]][VP[V'[V[kiss]][NP[me]]]]]]]]]]]]

(If you want to take a look at that visually, copy and paste that into this site and then click "Draw".)

*The "i" outside of the bracketed "he" is a notation our Prof uses to indicate that the subject is identical to the subject of the embedded clause. Not sure if you guys all use the same notation.

Question #1: Is this (-tense) morpheme etymologically related to the English preposition "to"? I looked at the definitions on Dictionary.com and they're all about the preposition. Where do they both come from? Is there a free morpheme such as this in other languages besides those that could be related to English?

Question #2: Where, in a structural tree, does the Fr. de go in the sentence, Je déteste cesse de pleurer. It can't be a (-tense) if it doesn't show up in Je veux pleurer. Right?

Question #3: How does Tagalog deal with infinitives? I'm incapable of forming a sentence involving them - i.e. "I want to know" = Gusto kong... alam? Mag-alam? Alam-an?

Oh yeah! and: Unrelated Question On French Discourse Markers (Might As Well Since I'm Here)

Question #4: In class, we gots to do a general paper on pragmatics. I'm thinking French pragmatics. Any good journals/other resources? Our school has a subscription to Jstor and I plan to check that out ASAP. Specifically, I'm interested in regional French discourse markers and pragmatic particles - i.e. "eh bon", "voilà", "alors", "fait que/faque", "c'est-a-dire", "genre", Canadian post-posed "là", reparative "enfin", the Parisian post-posed "quoi", the Acadian "mais dame" and la particule interrogative "-tu".
Subscribe

  • Post a new comment

    Error

    Anonymous comments are disabled in this journal

    default userpic

    Your reply will be screened

    Your IP address will be recorded 

  • 22 comments