ein_wunderkind (ein_wunderkind) wrote in linguaphiles,
ein_wunderkind
ein_wunderkind
linguaphiles

English vs. Native Language as a Learning Medium

Something interesting I've noticed in my Swedish course is that all of the students take notes in their native languages except for the students from Asia who opt to use English instead. They also choose to use English-Swedish dictionaries over Swedish-Chinese, Swedish-Korean, etc. The only exception to this is the single Japanese student in the class. She sticks to the English-Swedish dictionary but always writes in Japanese.

This really baffles me, so I asked the Korean girl in our study group what her reasoning was and she told me that Swedish and Korean are so different that it's really hard for her to understand translations of Swedish words and to explain Swedish grammar in Korean.

But I still just don't get why an individual would prefer a foreign language over their native language to learn ANOTHER foreign language. Anyone have any ideas or seen this before with other languages?

Incidentally I'm learning German via Swedish and I do find it easier through Swedish (so I understand the idea), but if I had the choice I would still use English.
Tags: learning languages
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