Circéus (six_crazy_guys) wrote in linguaphiles,
Circéus
six_crazy_guys
linguaphiles

Bibliography

I'm working on a bibliography of a fave author of mine. Turns out she's been translated into Russian. I know enough to put sounds om the stuff, but not much more.

Basically, this book has had 2 editions: ISBN 5-699-16113-9 and 5-699-13282-1, and although I can make out a collection ("Seriya: Anatomiya detectiva"), I can't tell what is the difference between them. Anybody can help?

(If someone manages to locate a library record for any of these books, I'd really appreciate.) Partly: the second one is available in several U.S. libraries (!), which allowed me to fill in the translator ("Marii Lazutkinoĭ", now to back-transcribe that in Russian...) an number of pages.
Tags: russian, translation request
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  • UDDER and WATER

    To the memory of Vladislav Illich-Svitych. This is just to bring attention to something very ‘Nostratic’ (far beyond ‘Indo-European’ languages —…

  • Three one-hundredths of a second

    (Somewhat prompted by watching the Olympics.) Why is that silly redundancy there in "three one-hundredths of a second"? Nobody says "two one-thirds…

  • EUROPA, etymology

    "... Agenor, king of the Phoenician city of Sidon, had a beautiful daughter Europa, literally (in Greek) the "wide-eyed". In fact, of course, not…