Juliet Capulet (euphoric1dr) wrote in linguaphiles,
Juliet Capulet
euphoric1dr
linguaphiles

question re: chinese/japanese script.

i'm still unsure about how these two languages compare, in terms of learning the written part to accompany the spoken language. am i right in that, chinese does not have an actual alphabet, with smaller pieces that you then use to construct more complex words - instead, each character corresponds to each syllable that you actually say?

whereas with japanese, i'm more confused because there are three different script forms. in order to be able to read something in japanese, would i have to know all three of these forms? and do i need to know about 3,000 characters for each to be able to read a japanese newspaper (which is what i was told i'd need to do, in order to perform the equivalent task in chinese.)
or is it less characters i'd need to know and memorize for japanese?

i'm curious to hear more about your experiences, if you've studied/are studying either of these languages. thanks guys =)

p.s. however do you manage the task of committing to memory, all these characters! i marvel at those of you who do. i don't know if my visual memory is capable of such. =/
Tags: asian languages, chinese, japanese, writing systems
Subscribe

  • UDDER and WATER

    To the memory of Vladislav Illich-Svitych. This is just to bring attention to something very ‘Nostratic’ (far beyond ‘Indo-European’ languages —…

  • Three one-hundredths of a second

    (Somewhat prompted by watching the Olympics.) Why is that silly redundancy there in "three one-hundredths of a second"? Nobody says "two one-thirds…

  • EUROPA, etymology

    "... Agenor, king of the Phoenician city of Sidon, had a beautiful daughter Europa, literally (in Greek) the "wide-eyed". In fact, of course, not…

  • Post a new comment

    Error

    Anonymous comments are disabled in this journal

    default userpic

    Your reply will be screened

    Your IP address will be recorded 

  • 36 comments

  • UDDER and WATER

    To the memory of Vladislav Illich-Svitych. This is just to bring attention to something very ‘Nostratic’ (far beyond ‘Indo-European’ languages —…

  • Three one-hundredths of a second

    (Somewhat prompted by watching the Olympics.) Why is that silly redundancy there in "three one-hundredths of a second"? Nobody says "two one-thirds…

  • EUROPA, etymology

    "... Agenor, king of the Phoenician city of Sidon, had a beautiful daughter Europa, literally (in Greek) the "wide-eyed". In fact, of course, not…