tortipede (tortipede) wrote in linguaphiles,
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Name changes poll

When we used to go to France as a family when I was little I got used to being a French Richard [ʀiʃɑʀ] rather than an English Richard [rɪtʃəd]. In the same way, my brother was Christophe [kʀistɔf] rather than Christopher [krɪstəfə]. So naturally, when I was learning Catalan, I began to call myself Ricard. My first Catalan tutor, Núria, told me off for this, on the basis that my name was not, in point of fact Ricard, saying that she did not intend to change her name just because she was in England. But this may have been influenced by the fact that there is no English version of 'Nuria' -- certainly the next tutor I had, Daniel, was quite happy with me adapting my name.

I guess the logic behind this is that, depending on the vagaries of my interlocutor's accent, I am no more [riˑtʃɑrd] than I am Ricard, so I feel I may as well go with the Catalan version. But, on the other hand, it is not purely logical: I wouldn't call myself Ricardo in Castilian, because that sounds sillier and more pretentious. But that judgement may itself be influenced by the fact that native English speakers occasionally call me Ricardo to supposed humorous effect, whereas they probably rarely subject a Luke or a Joanna to the same treatment.

Poll #1061197 Name/Language poll

When speaking a foreign language, do you:

adapt the form of your name to the language you're speaking;
11(10.4%)
adapt the pronunciation of your own name to the language you're speaking;
40(37.7%)
call yourself by a different name;
4(3.8%)
use the normal native pronunciation of your name, and expect others to mimic it as best they are able;
29(27.4%)
It depends what language I'm speaking.
22(20.8%)

If you answered "it depends" above, for what languages do you adapt the form/pronunciation?

And for which languages do you not adapt it?

Thinking about Fowler's dicta about French loans in English, and how making them sound too French or too English both sound wrong, when referring in your own language to friends who are speakers of other languages, do you:

pronounce their name as correctly as you can, according to their own native pronunciation;
62(59.6%)
adapt the pronunciation of their name partially to the sounds of your own language;
40(38.5%)
adapt the pronunciation of their name wholly to that of your own language?
2(1.9%)

Do you agree that "Ricardo" sounds more pretentious in English than "Ricard"?

Yes.
24(22.6%)
No.
51(48.1%)
I neither know nor care.
18(17.0%)
I'm not a native English speaker and really can't tell.
13(12.3%)

If you answered "Yes" above, suggest why you think this might be:

Do native speakers of your own first language sometimes use foreign equivalents/versions of your name to supposedly humorous effect?

Yes.
31(29.2%)
No.
75(70.8%)

If you answered "Yes" above, what is your name? And how does it get changed?


Tags: names
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