i_eron (i_eron) wrote in linguaphiles,
i_eron
i_eron
linguaphiles

laugh in many languages

In "the name of the rose" by Umberto Eco there is a Latin line (a part of Adso's dream):
Ut cachinnis dissolvatur, torqueatur rictibus!
I think it sounds very nice in Latin, that in addition to its agreeable meaning.

Apparently, in many translations of the book it is still in Latin.
There is a great sounding Russian translation by Elena Kostioukovitch:
Всем полопаться от смеха, скорчиться от хохота!
(roughly: vsem polo'patsia ot sme'ha, sko'rchitsia ot ho'hota!)

Some googling produced an English version in an article by Douglass Parker which I could not fully identify with:
May he dissolve in laughter, may he be racked with guffaws!

More googling produced a Turkish version:
kahkahalarla gülünsün, gülmekten katılınsın
(in http://www.uludagsozluk.com/k/ut-cachinnis-dissolvatur-torqueatur-rictibus/)
I do not know any Turkish (just heard some), but phonetically it is very nice (if I read it anything near correct).

Does anybody know translations of this line to English or other languages?
Or do you want to produce your own version? Thanks!
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