Ad astra per alia porci (paulistano) wrote in linguaphiles,
Ad astra per alia porci
paulistano
linguaphiles

Linguistic Phenomenon?

This question has been rattling around my head for years and I've been meaning to post about it for months. So, the background of the question is thus: when I was 18, right after I graduated high school, some dude my girlfriend and I went to school with wrote her an email. In it, he said something along the lines of "I had some extra time, so I thought I'd minus well write you."

A second example of this phenomenon is culled from my best friends. While they're arguing, they'll say "I concede your point." This isn't a type of spelling error (as in the first example) because they say it all out loud, but I don't think it's a spelling issue anyway . . .

Now, in the first example, the guy meant "might as well." My girlfriend and I had a heckuva time thinking of what he meant. In the second example, while "concede" works here, I think they're bastardizing "can see, and it drives me nutso every time I hear them say it.

Is this an example of what happens where people misunderstand lyrics and their brain fills in the words (the term escapes me at the moment), or another phenomenon entirely?
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  • EUROPA, etymology

    "... Agenor, king of the Phoenician city of Sidon, had a beautiful daughter Europa, literally (in Greek) the "wide-eyed". In fact, of course, not…

  • Word 'Climax'. A note for aspiring etymologists.

    The English word climax has two seemingly incompatible meanings of "climax" and "orgasm". Yet, we should not forget that the word has not only a…

  • The extended etymology for Ego, Εγώ ( I )

    The Oxford Etymologic Dictionary (OED) considers Ego / I as if it were a self-standing word developed within the Germanic and 'Indo-European'…