grengahlin (grengahlin) wrote in linguaphiles,
grengahlin
grengahlin
linguaphiles

a question to native English speakers

I have just begun with another translating project and there is a sentence I am not sure I understand completely, so I would like your opinion on the matter ;)

How exactly do you understand the underlined part of the following sentence:

He smiled, to show he meant no offence, but Scott takes offence like it's going out of fashion, and bristled.

Now, I understand what the words mean and what it could mean, but I was wondering if this expression has any set meanings or wider use (like it's going out of fashion, I mean), or is it just a figure of speech the author has come up with?

I think what it means is that the guy Scott never misses an opportunity to start a brawl when someone has uttered something that can be seen as an offence... but I might be mistaken... therefore, I ask for your help!

Thanks!

(The sentence is from Stef Penney's "The Tenderness of Wolves")


e d i t:  THANKS SO MUCH FOR SUCH A QUICK RESPONSE, EVERYONE !! :)
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