tortipede (tortipede) wrote in linguaphiles,
tortipede
tortipede
linguaphiles

New boy

Blurb for the community says introductory postings welcomed, so...

Native language: English
Can read, write, hold a reasonably sophisticated and grammatically correct conversation in: French, Catalan
Can read, sort of write (much thumbing of dictionary), communicate in: Spanish, Modern Greek, Occitan
Can read reasonably well but not speak: Portuguese, Italian, Old English
Can read (much thumbing of dictionary): Old Norse, Modern German, Swedish, Danish, Gothic
Struggle a bit with: Latin, Ancient Greek
Own books on, know a few words of, etc. Too many to remember. Old Frisian, Middle Egyptian, Farsi, Hittite, Trinidadian French Creole, Sanskrit, Oscan and Umbrian, Etruscan, Germanic Philology, etc.etc. etc.

Something like that, anyway.

Started learning Old English when I was 13, Gothic and Old Norse by about 15. Recently had an email exchange with my girlfriend concerning the etymology of aubergine. Hoping I've come to the right place...

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  • UDDER and WATER

    To the memory of Vladislav Illich-Svitych. This is just to bring attention to something very ‘Nostratic’ (far beyond ‘Indo-European’ languages —…

  • Three one-hundredths of a second

    (Somewhat prompted by watching the Olympics.) Why is that silly redundancy there in "three one-hundredths of a second"? Nobody says "two one-thirds…

  • Word 'Climax'. A note for aspiring etymologists.

    The English word climax has two seemingly incompatible meanings of "climax" and "orgasm". Yet, we should not forget that the word has not only a…

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  • UDDER and WATER

    To the memory of Vladislav Illich-Svitych. This is just to bring attention to something very ‘Nostratic’ (far beyond ‘Indo-European’ languages —…

  • Three one-hundredths of a second

    (Somewhat prompted by watching the Olympics.) Why is that silly redundancy there in "three one-hundredths of a second"? Nobody says "two one-thirds…

  • Word 'Climax'. A note for aspiring etymologists.

    The English word climax has two seemingly incompatible meanings of "climax" and "orgasm". Yet, we should not forget that the word has not only a…