Word Herder (word_herder) wrote in linguaphiles,
Word Herder
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Latin at lunchtime

I am reading Umberto Eco's The Name of the Rose at the moment, and am having a bit of fun attempting rough translations of the Latin sprinkled throughout the book.  Despite never having taken Latin, I've been doing okay, but I've run into a few words that are not in my Oxford Latin Dictionary and wondered if anyone could help.  Here's the complete quote with the bold words representing ones I've been unable to translate:
Monasterium sine libris...est sicut civitas sine opibuscastrum sine numeris, coquina sine suppellecti, mensa sine cibis, hortus sine herbis, pratum sine floribus, arbor sine foliis...
This was my guess at what it all meant.  I understood the basic structure of BLANK without BLANK; there were a couple of pairs, though, that I couldn't figure out and are in brackets and words in bold are the mysteries:
A monastery without books...is like [citizenship without rights], [settlements without class], a cook without cooking implements, a table without food, a garden without plants, a meadow without flowers, a tree without leaves...
What threw me is that the first two pairs, which seemed political, didn't match the remaining pairs, which were more basic to everyday life and nature.  One or two of the words also seemed more Italian than Latin; since the tale is set in the late 14th century, this would be a fairly accurate reflection of how Latin morphed during the Middle Ages, I guess.

Any thoughts?
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  • UDDER and WATER

    To the memory of Vladislav Illich-Svitych. This is just to bring attention to something very ‘Nostratic’ (far beyond ‘Indo-European’ languages —…

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    (Somewhat prompted by watching the Olympics.) Why is that silly redundancy there in "three one-hundredths of a second"? Nobody says "two one-thirds…

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