Ian (bakedgoods10) wrote in linguaphiles,
Ian
bakedgoods10
linguaphiles

Miss по-русски

One thing I've realized I've never learned to say in Russian, is that I miss someone/something. When working through a conversation, I've always avoided the verb.

Today I tried looking it up, and of course found various translations. However, I understand nearly all of them as something else, for example "Miss" Teen Alaska, shoot and a "miss", but not really what I was seeking. One word that was said to have a double-meaning is "скучать"...but I translate that as to be bored. I don't want to say, "Я скучаю (по) тебе," and tell someone I'm missing that I'm bored of him.

In the end I used "тосковать" to replace "miss" with "yearn": "Я тоскую (по) тебе." Would this be the best way to say I miss someone or is there a more direct translation?

...and just to be sure, I use the dative case for both of the aforementioned verbs, correct? Oh, and do I really need the preposition "по" for each?

I feel so rusty. I'm going to laugh if it's something I already know, but can't recall. Thanks for your help!
Tags: russian
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    To the memory of Vladislav Illich-Svitych. This is just to bring attention to something very ‘Nostratic’ (far beyond ‘Indo-European’ languages —…

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