شيخ الحب (optimussven) wrote in linguaphiles,
شيخ الحب
optimussven
linguaphiles

Posty McPosterson...

So, yeah, this is a "x in all sorts of languages" post, but I'm doing it anyway because you all know you secretly love them.

In English if you want to jokingly (or condescendingly) refer to some attribute of a person you can do it in a few ways. Among the common ones are "Captain Blank" and "Blanky McBlankerson" (fill in the blanks with an adjective of course).

Examples (we'll use snarky):

Captain Snarky

Snarky McSnarkerson

Both could be used to chide some friend of yours who is being snarky.


Arabic uses Abu (father) for the same purpose:

"Abu Wajheyn" (Father Two-Faced), for example, is the first that came to mind. Sometimes you also hear "Muhendis" (Engineer) or Sheikh.

So what's the deal in other langauges? How do you do it?
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  • Latin Transaltion

    I'm trying to translate "The Dude Abides" to latin. The best I can come up with is "vir commorror" but I'm not sure of the proper case to use.

  • It's all Greek to me

    This was in Thessaloniki. Anyone can translate it? Many thanks.

  • Auditory strategies for learning a dead language?

    I've decided to start learning Classical Greek, but in planning out my studying, I'm running into an issue. For my other languages, a lot of my…