February 19th, 2009

cat
  • tacente

Spanish request

Yeah, one of those "how do you say"...

I need the translation of the following into native Spanish (if any regional preference is important, it should be Argentine - but it might be also more or less neutral "international" Spanish):

“Listen to me, you stupid cow, shut up and stand right there across the table and give me what I tell you to give me. I’ve got a crisis here, I don’t need your shit.”

The person who is saying this (a woman) is highly intelligent and educated, and really good-natured (so it's not gang talk), but very angry.
(It's not something I'm going to be saying :-)

Thanks in advance!
Corvus albus

children play... terminological question

 


(Photo from: Asia-Pacific Database on Intangible Cultural Heritage)

I am interested in special kind of games children (c. 5-10 years old) use to play all over the world. This kind of play involves two (some times more) kids, standing one in front of another, singing semi-meaningless repetitive song, which is accompanied by a strict set of movements and hand gestures (like clapping, stamping, etc.). 
I don't know if there is a special term for this kind of games, but I am fascinated by them... I can look at them for ever - their complexity, their ritualistic character, their sectarian, religious-like rhythm... I know it exist all over the globe, in all possible societies.
What is the proper term to call them?
Anybody knows a book, a study, or a site collecting them and studying them?
 
QUESTION

"Great, just great!"

Does the sarcastic utterance, "Great, just great!" have some origin in popular culture? As in a play, movie, or TV series? Is it something said outside the United States? Or have Americans perhaps even coopted it from some other English-speaking nation's slang?
Holmes pipe 2

Frauenzimmer

I have just been looking at a French translation of an old German book in which 'Frauenzimmer' is translated as 'femme de chambre' (with comical effect in the specific passage, since it the ladies in question would have taken that an insult).

All the same 'Frauenzimmer' is an odd word, and this prompted me to look up its origin. Apparently in late Middle High German, it was a term for the chamber of a (grand) lady, and there was then a shift of meaning from the place to the people who could be found in it, the attendants of the grand lady, until it finally became a term for an individual woman; applied in a neutral sense initially, until it underwent a decline in the course of the 19th Century, and is now only used (I presume) in a disparaging or facetious manner. An interesting example of the social mobility of words.

Deutsch to Polski

Hello all!!

I have tried to find a translation of this, but just haven't had any luck and thought that asking here would be my best bet.

Would anyone be able to translate this song from German into Polish for me??? Or be able to give me a link to an already finished and correct translation? I would be extremely greatful!!

Thanks in advance to anyone who might be able to help me out!

"Lilith"

Herzdieb von Eisbrecher

Die Zeit steht still, die Sehnsucht steht.
Ich bin allein und warte auf dich.
Komm und heil mich, denn ich weiß nicht,
ob wir uns wiedersehen.

Klammheimlich still und ohne Laut
Ein Tropfen Blut auf schweißnasser Haut
Komm und heil mich, komm und frei mich,
dann tut es nicht so weh

Ich hol mir dein Herz heut Nacht.
Noch schlägt es in dir ganz leise und sacht

Es muss so rein sein, doch bald wird es mein sein.
Dann schlägt es tief in mir.
Ich hol mir dein Herz!

Ich hol mir dein Herz!

Der Schmerz brennt tief in meiner Brust
Ich bin verloren, du hast es gewusst.
Komm und heil mich, denn ich weiß nicht,
ob wir uns wiedersehen.

Die Ewigkeit ein Augenblick. Reich mir die Hand,
hol mich ins Leben zurück
Komm und heil mich, komm und frei mich,
dann tut es nicht so weh

Ich hol mir dein Herz heut Nacht.
Noch schlägt es in dir ganz leise und sacht

Es muss so rein sein, doch bald wird es mein sein.
Dann schlägt es tief in mir. So tief in mir!

Ich sink tiefer, immer tiefer
bis ich mich in dir verlier
Ich hol mir dein Herz
Ich hol mir was mir gehört
heut Nacht

Es muss so rein sein, doch bald wird es mein sein.
Dann schlägt es tief in mir.
Ich hol mir dein Herz heut Nacht.

Noch schlägt es in dir ganz leise und sacht
eye
  • joho07

"It's full of sick"

I was in the English movie theatre in my area in Munich today and had to stop at the ladies room. One of the stalls was not being used, and when I asked why, a lady answered "It's full of sick". Now I don't know if she was a native German or English speaker, because I didnt' catch the accent out of those few words and she didn't say anything more. Although I've never heard this expression before (while living in the US), I knew immediately what she meant. I probably would have said "It's full of throw-up" or even "It's full of puke", though.

Is this a common expression elsewhere?

Sorry for the not so tasteful topic. =)
  • kaoriz

(no subject)

Hello all!
I was wondering, how many of you have tried Rosetta Stone, and what do you think of it? I speak English and Italian, and I'm attempting German through the program.

-kaoriz
dark goat

stop riding my ass, you're driving me up the wall!

If we look 200 years back, most languages with suitable technologies probably had a word for travelling on a horse (or another animal), and another for travelling on a conveyance hitched to a horse (or another animal). When newfangled inventions such as bicycles and cars came into being, people had to decide which of the verbs for travelling would work best for these new conveyances. It's relatively easy for a bicycle, since you straddle it so very much like a horse, but a car is a little trickier to map. It's like a cart hitched to a horse, only the horse is mechanical and hidden inside the cart! No wait, it's actually like you're riding a mechanical horse that's been hollowed out so you sit inside it! No wait... It'd be curious to see how different languages handle this semantic space.

In English, you ride a horse/bicycle, and you drive a cart/car, right? But you need a driver's license to ride a motorcycle, hmmm... How do other languages assign verbs to these? (for the purposes of this post, I'm focussing on the person actively steering a conveyance, so the fact that you "ride on a bus" (not 'in') is tangential).

(based on a comment in a previous post)
maluhia

My Dear Children - Translation Request

Hey guys,
I know this is kinda lame, but I was hoping people could help me translate "my dear children" into as many different languages as possible. So far, I have Spanish (mis queridos hijitos), Portuguese (os meus queridos filhos) and Yiddish (mein kinderlich). A friend who speaks Marathi told me it's Namaste majay poora phonetically, but doesn't know the characters, and a friend who knows Mandarin said it's wo de xiao hai zi, but also doesn't know the characters. Does anyone know how you would write these in the languages? Also, any other languages are great!
Thanks so much!
kaizers orchestra: janove sunset

A question...

I've been meaning to join here for some time, but it always slipped my mind. But having a question finally got me around to doing it. :)

It's a bit of an odd question, but I was hoping someone could help me in translating "little magpie" to Norwegian, preferably Nynorsk. I know the word "skjor," but I'm not clear on diminutives. :/

I'd be very grateful, and thanks in advance!