June 16th, 2008

setik

"speaks in languages the continuation of which he doesn't know"

The question may sound weird, but still:) We have a phrase "And this man always starts to speak in languages the continuation of which he doesn't know!" The context here is the following: some aliens are reading thoughts of some people from the Earth, and this way they try to learn the languages these earthlings are speaking. But one of the earthlings, thinking that aliens are foreigners, asked them 'Parlez-vous Francais?', 'Sprechen Sie Deutsch?', but these two phrases are all he knows in French and German. So, then, the alien says that's it's hard to learn the language when he is always speaking in languages, the continuation of which he doesn't know.

Finally, what I am asking: is this phrase "And this man always starts to speak in language the continuation of which he doesn't know!" understandable, knowing the context? Or, maybe, I should change smth? And what is better, 'the rest of which' or 'the continuation of which'?
Then, is it possible to say just '...is always speaking in languages..." instead of '...always starts to speak languages...'? I just thought, the latter makes the sentence more clear.

But, please, don't propose to change the whole phrase into smth like 'He always speaks in languages he doesn't know properly', because it this case all the irony is lost, I want to preserve 'continuation':)

Thanks to everyone who could at least read this complicated thing till the end:)