April 16th, 2007

Just a quick question ...

How do you say "Happy Easter" in Polish? Google's given me "Wesołych Świąt Wielkanocnych!", "Szczęśliwej Wielkanocy!" and "Wesołych Świąt Wielkiej Nocy" and "Wesolego Alleluja" on various sites. Which would you say is the best, in an email to a Polish friend of mine?
 

Thank you!
fave eye

Spanish and/or French?

Hello everyone,
Next fall I'll start my last semester at the college and decided to have a linguistic treat for myself. I want to take beginner's French while finishing up my German Studies major (yes, will be taking a class in advanced German per semester, too). But Spanish appeals to me as well. The problem is, I am not sure where I'd like to live/work after graduation. It looks like French will be more useful in Europe while Spanish is better for the States. Oh, so confused..
Those of you who speak both Spanish and French, would it be ok to take them simultaneously, both from scratch? I do have a 2-year background in Italian. Never have a chance to speak it but still understand it very well.
Any thoughts on how practical it is to know certain languages in Europe and USA would also be appreciated.
Thank you for your help!
X-posted in foreignlanguage
Eddie

Cheering different countries

I'm planning a party with some friends for the Eurovision Song Contest, and to add a bit of "local flavour" I'm going to write down phrases to support the different countries. Since we're almost all Australian-born, there's no deep-seated loyalty to any given country, so I'm working on the idea that the cheers will be for general use.
What I'm after, then, is how one would say "Come on [Country]" or "Go [Country]" (or the local idiomatic equivalent) in the local languages of the following countries. There are some double-ups of national languages, but if there's a particularly Austrian-dialect way of cheering for Austria (for example) I'd love to hear it. Transliteration from Hebrew/Greek/Cyrillic/etc is important where relevant, and some idea of pronunciation may be handy as well:
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