Аксиома aka Эстель (aksioma_tg) wrote in linguaphiles,

Borders?

Can you please help me to understand a strange phrase from a book?
It is about a Gran Prix driver participating in a rally.

"On the 40th, in Loch Achray, he crashed, inflicting severe damage on the Lotus Cortina. He then rolled into a ditch on the 45th, Glengap. «We tripped over the Border», he said, and so they had."

I really can't understand why the author uses the capital letter to write "the border"? Does he mean anything but the edge of the road?
The only thing I can think of is the Borders, a region near the Scotland border. It is where the driver was from. But it still doesn't make any sense to me.

Thanks a lot!
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  • 10 comments

smtfhw

June 23 2014, 14:19:09 UTC 4 months ago

I would say that you are spot on with your assumption that this was somewhere on the border between England and Scotland, known as the Borders, and that was where the event happened. There is even a Border Rally, which went rather badly wrong this year with a number of fatalities.

Can I also just correct your assumption that the person having the accident would be a Grand Prix driver. With VERY few exceptions (and in recent decades only Robert Kubica and Kimi Raikkonen fit the bill), rally drivers pursue a very different career path to single-seater drivers, from whose ranks Grand Prix drivers come. And they're not a Grand Prix driver unless that have actually driven in Formula One. Sorry! Rant over :)!

aksioma_tg

June 23 2014, 14:25:34 UTC 4 months ago

I would say that you are spot on with your assumption that this was somewhere on the border between England and Scotland, known as the Borders, and that was where the event happened. There is even a Border Rally, which went rather badly wrong this year with a number of fatalities

Thanks, but I still can't understand what the phase about the Border means. Can you explaing the meaning?

Can I also just correct your assumption that the person having the accident would be a Grand Prix driver.

Well, it's not an assumption, 'cause I know for sure who this driver is as I'm translating a book about him :) His name is Jim Clark if it helps.

smtfhw

June 23 2014, 19:14:19 UTC 4 months ago

I don't know if anyone else has explained since, but the area between England and Scotland is often referred to as the Borders.

And in the case of Jim Clark, he was indeed a Grand Prix driver so I'll give you that - that was back in the day when such practices were far more common, which is why he also raced in the Indy 500. He also came from the Borders.

lost_house

June 24 2014, 09:30:12 UTC 4 months ago

i assumed it's a pun on the location. a border being and edge of something, often marked by a raised edge that someone could trip over, and the location being the Borders.

aksioma_tg

June 24 2014, 13:37:49 UTC 4 months ago

Yeah, got it. Thanks

muckefuck

June 23 2014, 14:43:58 UTC 4 months ago

I thought it was a little joke based on the fact that the ditch marked the border between England and Scotland. (Glengap Forest is about 40 km inside Scotland. Was the 46th stage in England?)

aksioma_tg

June 23 2014, 14:59:26 UTC 4 months ago

I don't really know, because it happened in 1966, but it does make sence! Thanks!

yiskah

June 23 2014, 15:41:13 UTC 4 months ago

That's what I'd assume too.

aksioma_tg

June 23 2014, 15:42:36 UTC 4 months ago

Thanks!

thekumquat

June 23 2014, 21:05:35 UTC 4 months ago

It was the RAC rally, and yes it's the border between England and Scotland, capitalised because it's being used like a placename.
The rally had most of its stages in Wales (the early ones) and England (where it ended), but in the 60s had 3 stages in Scotland, known as the forest stages.
That year Jim Clark and another British Grand Prix driver, Graham Hill, both entered the rally but didn't finish - all the results are online.