Brandoch Daha (ticktockman) wrote in linguaphiles,

peddler vs pedlar

I was surprised to see the spelling "pedlar" for what I have always previously seen as "peddler". Is this a regional variance? I'm in the U.S.
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  • 13 comments

snezhkin

May 17 2014, 12:55:22 UTC 5 months ago

Have you ever heard about England?

ticktockman

May 17 2014, 12:59:26 UTC 5 months ago

Certainly. Is pedlar the preferred spelling in England?

snezhkin

May 17 2014, 14:04:32 UTC 5 months ago

they are not so rich to double letters for nothing

orpheus_samhain

May 17 2014, 13:18:19 UTC 5 months ago

The Free Dictionary says that it's chiefly British.

http://thefreedictionary.com/pedlar

spoonisoutthere

May 17 2014, 13:37:59 UTC 5 months ago

I wonder does this mean we should use todlar instead of toddler?

muckefuck

May 17 2014, 14:39:41 UTC 5 months ago

But medlar for meddler would only spawn confusion.

beesandbrews

May 18 2014, 00:02:16 UTC 5 months ago

Unless of course you're referring to interfering fruit.

ryntha_doghare

May 17 2014, 15:29:52 UTC 5 months ago

Oh. I'm English and I use 'peddler'... SUDDENLY MY NATIONALITY IS CALLED INTO QUESTION

orpheus_samhain

May 17 2014, 15:46:59 UTC 5 months ago

heh

ryntha_doghare

May 17 2014, 17:50:22 UTC 5 months ago

lol great icon

come_to_think

May 18 2014, 00:32:38 UTC 5 months ago

Usually but not exclusively "pedlar" in Britain, regularly "peddler" in America, says the OED. The history is obscure, but the word seems to be a good deal older than the verb "peddle", which is presumably a back formation. On the other hand, there is no historical justification for the "a".

tenou_k

May 18 2014, 11:52:18 UTC 5 months ago

A friend's apartment building in Vancouver, BC had a sign on the front door that said "NO PEDLARS" and we would always make fun of it. Apparently it's not the common Canadian spelling, but it looked like a pre-made sign intended to be put up in front of houses, not a custom-made deal, so I always assumed it was either archaic or an Anglicism from a more British past.

jaderabbit

May 18 2014, 18:48:31 UTC 5 months ago

I always thought it was the spelling favored by the Knights Templar. ;)