karinmollberg (Mollberg is a C.M. Bellman quote) (karinmollberg) wrote in linguaphiles,
karinmollberg (Mollberg is a C.M. Bellman quote)
karinmollberg
linguaphiles

Food Terms of Endearment

In French I first came across "mon (petit) chou(cho)" and wondered, how a vegetable as endearing as cabbage came to be a term of endearment but there is a popular pastry with cream inside called "chou" and then it makes some sense, as "sweetiepie".

In the meaning of "teacher´s pet" and "blue-eyed boy" or "enfant gâté" it is more derogatory, even evoking an idea of inner rottenness while "my little cauliflower" sounds bittersweet enough as a combination of food and flower terms.

So far I know of "mon sucre d´orge" (my barley sugar, must not be misread as "d´ogre"), "mon trognon" (my fruit core) and "ma mie" which refers to the inner, softer part of bread (besides literally meaning my friend or love, from "amie"). Then ..."mon coco" (my egg) but there it already gets ambiguous for both egg and hen can only be food terms to carnivores or lacto-vegetarians.

If one starts looking at all the animal terms of endearment as main courses with the eyes of the carnivore predator this of course multiplies the possibilities but here I am mainly asking for food terms, firstly but feel free to add those animals that are often or can be eaten and no insult intended to anyone, on the contrary (cannibals need their protein too).

What terms of endearment that are or are related to food do you know of in your language(s) and what is their meaning?
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English accepts pretty much any food item as an endearment, although dessert-type things are more acceptable. Some sound humorous but they're acceptable, especially if prefaced with "my little" or "my sweet" or something like that. Oh hey it's you! I just noticed.

Oh, food item means, generally, a whole food - my little apple, my ear of corn, my hot dog, my radish, my pork bun - not *my pad thai, *my clam chowder, *my cassoulet. But you CAN use a composite dish if it's dessert - my baked alaska, my crepe suzette, my banana split. And thinking about it, calling someone a dish or bowl or plate of whatever is a little surprising sounding but acceptable. My serving of fried rice. My bowl of bouillabaisse.

These are generated by a rule in English and are not conventional. There are also conventional ones - pumpkin, muffin, honey. These don't need to be preceded by a personal pronoun and can be used as terms of address, "Pumpkin, would you remember to pick up the dry cleaning?" "Is this your ball, honey?" Honey is REALLY conventional, and can be used by adults to address strange children.
Hi ho, yes it´s me your baked Alaska from Viking Land, again!

I particularly like the elaborate ones referring to whole(some) dishes like my serving of fried rice. Had never heard of those before.

Some of the dessert terms of endearment sound elaborate enough to almost become tautological (like the Swedish expression "tårta på tårta" which literally means cake on cake) and make me wonder, whether anyone would actually say that to anyone they hold dear.
(Calling a man "my banana split" sounds slightly worrying but maybe that´s just gay, fey me.) Spoken in the kitchen, to make them make a bowl of bouillabaisse for one and a bit tongue in cheek, right, Honeybunny? Hope you don´t mind my drifting mind and calling you names. Interesting that it´s usually a whole food: ear of corn is as nice as the rice.

These sound pleasingly unconventional indeed! Honey I knew of, it comes over like the English habit of calling perfect strangers "Love", a way of addressing someone I love but one that confused me first time I heard it there as a teenager.
Those examples are really stretching the boundaries of permissibility but they sound funny or clever or eccentric, not completely strange, like calling someone "my little donkey" would or "my little Douglas fir."
My little donkey implies a certain servitude on the recipient´s part, doesn´t it? My little Douglas fir sounded completely mysterious to me but then I peek-a-boohed under the scales of the Douglas fir cone and saw the little mice hiding out from the fire, there. Lovely oral but now digital legend I´d never heard of before.
Honey, pumpkin, sugar, cupcake, peach, and sweetie-pie as you already mentioned.
Honey and pumpkin I was familiar with, peach I´ve heard and sweetie-pie too but not so much (my) cupcake. Thank you!
Cupcake is more recent, probably due to the sudden craze for them. I've never heard "macaron" though they're the current in thing (here anyway).
Me neither, concerning "macaron" but it would be interesting what with the foie gras variety that I´m not sure Kath of the Medici (who usually got it alright with the art of feeding their dear ones quality stuff, unlike the Borgia) or her fear-inducing cook had thought of as a treat for uncurable carnivores among their favourites, already.
Gives "cookie" a new, less sweet meaning, more in the direction of http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Umami perhaps but the Italians of today do http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gelato in any thinkable and unthinkable flavour, breaking all borders of what can be considered as "good taste" by the un-curious.
There is a good place in Nice with a few hundred varieties including bacon, chubby and hubby hubby http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_ice_cream_flavors. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ice_cream flavours such as hokey pokey or garlic (depending on how the relationship is going) should be used as an endearment concerning anemic blondes, as I believe Mr. Marlowe does somewhere but rather in the pejorative sense, since it´s actually dangerous to have in its cryogenic state.
Hokey-pokey is our national ice cream flavour!
Probably a wiser choice than Crab, Tigger Tail or Schweddy Balls all of which might lead to unfortunate misunderstandings concerning national good taste whereas the Vermonster (with its 14.000 calories) and Yes Pecan can only be described as bold.
Here in France I´m particularly fond of an old classic back in fashion again: Beurre Salé or Fleur de Sel which is close to the mentioned Butter Brickle or Butter Pecan, it may not quite reach up to the saviouriness of the Vermonster but goes a long way doing its damndest!

vilakins

1 year ago

karinmollberg

1 year ago

In Polish food-related terms of endearment are not so popular, we prefer animals, like kotku, pieseczku, misiu. [ little cat, dog and bear, or even teddy-bear, in vocative].

Food: cukiereczek candy, and I can't think of anything else at the moment O_O
Yes, animals seem to be the most common terms of endearment, in France it´s often barnyard animals http://french.about.com/od/vocabulary/a/love_2.htm and those you mention are not normally considered edible in our culture, I think. Fried teddy-bear? Hm, no;)

Cukiereczek sounds sweet. Thanks for the input. Am sure this has been up before but maybe we will have some more...
Your enfant gâté reminds me of 'cookie-cutter' (n. or adj., always pejorative -- see 'cookie'). Also 'bad/rotten apple' and 'apple polisher'/'apple of one's eye'. A few of my teachers used to call us 'ducks/duckies', 'chickadees,' 'brussel sprouts,' and some combination of sweet + pea, potato, pie, plum, pudding...

In Scots, there's this nursery rhyme: "Clap, clap handies! / Kissy mammy noo! / Eh! where's my sugar-ploom! / Eh! where's my doo! / Cuddle in, my trootie / Mammy's tootie-lootie! / Clap, clap handies!"

Catullus and others use 'mellitus' (honey) with some frequency, and 'ocellus'- (little eye) or 'labellum' (little lip) meum more. Also Plautus, whose Milphio in Poenulus tries to detain the girl by calling her "meum mel! meum cor! mea colostra! meus molliculus caseus!" (my honey! my heart! my calf milk! my cheese curds!"
The little rotters, chickadees indeed. I wonder, if they have anything to do with "chicks" for female rotters into rock stars which isn´t too far off topic to make a pointe with, is it?

I was (secretely) hoping someone might want to go in that direction having just enjoyed myself by reading the Swedish Language Police´s site on popular idioms like misread tautologies and once-upon-a-time terms of endearment that slowly but menacingly turn into their opposite direction just to bite someone´s tail, in the bitter ...er: end.
Like the French expression "pas terrible" which confused me as an immigrant til I understood what terrible things had happened to it fairly recently enough not to be evident in dictionnaries, even "horrible" in French has been turned around by now like someone looking back from out of the mirror using the wrong hand at making themselves up to look more sugar-plum fairy-like.

Funny how those brussel sprouts et consortes you mention don´t seem advisable for those of us who are currently on a strict carbohydrate diet. They´re all quite starchy foods, aren´t they? If we disregard the apple-stuffed duckies, that is but I like to read this my own dietary way.

That scottish rhyme is lovely, I think, because I´m unsure about the exact meaning of the trootie, tootie-lootie and doo. One can almost hear a faint melody in there.
Clap clap candies...
Oh good old Catullus, causing odiable diabetes mellitus with but a few words and then the poor platypus getting it all wrong with the breast milk of barnyard animals to impress the chicks but who can blame someone who has to go down through the woods of night with that kind of a snout in the one skin given them and forgive the slight drifting due to the ugly duckling undertow in Mollberg Speak. In case you´d like to play in my sandfilled barnyard just gimme that big bucket of yours, will you?
Schiller reportedly could only write to the smell of rotten apples. Guess, you knew.
In Russian it's the same as in Polish: "animal terms" of endearment are more popular than the food ones...
Still, "my sweet" is fairly popular. albeit it can be quite ironic.
There is also a way to pay a compliment to a plump woman by calling her булочка or пышка (both words can be translated as "a bun"), and сдобный (referring to "short pastry") is a good adjective for describing a buxom body.
The ironic part of these terms are what I love best about them, it´s hard to imagine anyone anywhere pronouncing these kinds of words in utter earnest, however kindly meant at being eaten up alive by love´s flames.

I like the Russian "bun" and even more "short pastry" for a pleasantly plump female, it actually exists in German as "Dicke(r)" (literally "fatty", with an "r" added it´s masculine) or "Dickerchen" though this sounds more like "chubby" which is slightly nicer to say to someone but still supposes a good portion (sic) of gaiety (as in "playfulness") on part of the person hearing it, I imagine it enjoys a dubious popularity with the desired sex whichever one it is.

In most languages it seems comme il faut to call dear ones names of animals, in Germany two of them are (arguably) edible:
"Gummibärchen" (literally http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gummy_bear which refers to a certain sweet made out of fruit gum) and "Schnecke" (or the diminutive "Schneckchen") which means slug or snail.
The French, of course, have no problem eating those girls as either a main course, entry or part of a sumptuous menu. However, calling a female dear "Nacktschnecke" ("escargot" in French http://fr.wiktionary.org/wiki/limace) at night may reportedly lead to results contrary to intention, depending on her sense of http://thesaurus.com/browse/humor, which as we can see in the etymology part on the upper righthand side, leads us back to the body and its various fluids.

Usually, when it comes to carnivore food, it´s interesting to notice how we humans prefer the females of the species we eat, which leads us still farther astray what with leftover "Knutschflecken" (love bites) as (un)wanted results of regarding the desired species as a piece of meat or even a forbidden ("verboten" is used as a term of desirability in German and may be counted in as term of endearment) fruit. Still further: seafood ("my little oyster") when it comes to our bodily devices as in the indecent jest on how "two things smell of fish and one of them is fish" which I first heard from someone from New Zeeland. Garum, garum...
"Knutschflecken sounds as a name for German bread :^))))) I dunno why...

There is a Russian chain of readywear for plus-size women called Пышка (Bun). so the term isn't offensive at all... it may sound as dubious compliment, of course...

I guess the idea of eating a loved one comes from the idea "love is a savage passion... love makes savages and animals out of respectable people" etc... that's why leopard prunt is supposed to look sexy. But the idea of imaging one's beloved as a bit of cabbage (and not as a rabbit, for example) sounds silly...
Anyway, most terms of endearment (animal, food or otherwise) fall into category "silly things one does for love".... the trick is discerning when a person is sincere.

"two things smell of fish and one of them is fish" aha...

karinmollberg

May 19 2014, 13:44:52 UTC 1 year ago Edited:  May 19 2014, 19:58:59 UTC

Knutschflecken as bread (Brötchen; das Mädchen der Brote) is brilliant! I´m pondering on in the direction of other honeybunnies, particularly for vampires (filled with red berry jams). We may have created a new bloody business or, in case of doubt, renewed the windmill wheel (though not that uncomfortable one the Borg misuse for their brown cup of goy; "Herbal tea? No thanks" as Professor Elemental says).

Am so sad I can´t read kyrillic (so please don´t feel offended if I don´t friend you back since it would be so one-sided a friendship though I have some on my f-list I like to read where it may not be mutual; time to think of the thermodynamics in terms of endearment) yet. This is because I must learn Portuguese in the meantime to read Nature´s only poet in his own language and then some.

I remember, having it pointed out to me by my Communications tutor, how leopard skin would represent the whole world in certain cults when I used one to sit on for an SF-fanzine presentation at marketing school so it´s not just about reproduction in that sordid sense but truly universal in a magical ditto and since the idea of love cannot be called scientific yet, it has to descend from its pillar of purity t´ affections and faculties, reclining on pregnant pillows like Mme Monet on her canapé (sic; in this case not edible though she looks both bored and hungry). We must not forbear our allied spheres their right to sit back or down as it be and eat, their nekkid backs tattooed with musical symbols but only if female.

Which is no excuse for serving a loved one cabbage as morning gift unless, one refers to one´s loved one as a rabbit ("mein Häschen"). Not even for un- or intended humorous effect like the Swedish duo who won the Swedish Song contest in 1973 with an unforgettable ode to the beloved´s breasts symbolised by birds mating ("dina bröst är som svalor som häckar") but got lost in international Eurovision competition.

Glad we are talking mamalicious garments, in German the expression "Vollschlank" (fully slim, sort of) must be one of the most endearing euphemisms for foremostly female obesity concerning Venuses of Willendorf rather than Milo when it comes to body idealism.

Speaking of, sincerity does not exclude humour in my book, on the contrary: I regard it as a remedy. A matter of taste, that indeed returns us to our senses, such as for instance: smell...
We may have created a new bloody business * Oh yeah, vampires are a big business nowadays (anyway they should be much more interesting customers than zombies).

leopard skin would represent the whole world in certain cults * Oh, I didn't know that. And it sounds quite interesting (actually, I had a thought immediately that to compare the world to a leopard skin, one must first see it from the air... or see it on a map. Ergo. adept of these cults had air travel)

kyrillic * Actually, your first spelling was right: it's Cyrillic.

Learning Portuguese is great. Theoretically I could learn it relatively easily as I'm fluent in Spanish and can read French. I love the sound of spoken Portuguese.

"Vollschlank" (fully slim, sort of) - it sounds brilliant! Two compliments in one: to compliment a woman on being slim and pleasntly plump... Anyway, the Venus of Milo is plump by modern standards,Here is a funny project on this topic http://www.takepart.com/feature/2014/05/15/famous-paintings-photoshopped-to-look-like-fashion-models?cmpid=rk-fb

with an unforgettable ode to the beloved´s breasts symbolised by birds mating * I'm speechless....

karinmollberg

May 22 2014, 09:04:34 UTC 1 year ago Edited:  May 22 2014, 12:02:29 UTC

Not sure, which ones live...or rather: stay (un)dead, longer of our presumptive consumers, vampires or zombies? I Imagine it will be hard to do the necessary quantitative marketing research what with demographics as a clear difficulty, maybe we should resort to qualitative methods instead.

Ah, Cyrillic, of course, I sometimes get mixed up about such details at switching back and forth inbetween the four languages I´m fairly fluent in, so far; in Swedish it is written with a "k" in lowercase letter, in German in uppercase but still with a "K".

Exactly my reaction from having heard Portuguese spoken in Lissabon first time, recently. I love the sound of the language too though I don´t understand much Spanish and remember sadly little of the Latin I took long ago. But I will definitely try to learn Portuguese well enough to read in it. Yet another project...

Thanks for the link, though I find these results of photo-shopping the female body more horrible than entertaining even if also good as food for thought. *Phew, look how we stick to the point(e)...
Have you read or heard of Broby-Johansen´s "Body and Clothes"? I believe, it has aged well though it stops too early in the history of his subject, in the late 1960s. He may even have mentioned the leopard skin as symbol but I can´t remember now, it´s been too long ago I read him. However, I´ll look into the spotted matter, further, fascinating as it is.

Yes, the Swedish contribution to the Eurovision Song Contest in that year was indeed a nadir when it comes to word-finding and songwriting. It was not a winner.
Hi!
I'm really enjoying this conversation, yet I have had a series of mishaps with my Internet connection. Now I'm here again.
I've Googled "Body and Clothes", if I come across it in English or Spanish, I'll read it (I have a soft spot for reading about clothes versus... erm... actually wearing something more elaborate than T-shirts and jeans or boho dresses).
I love this journal http://www.bergfashionlibrary.com/page/99/fashion-theory (a journal on Fashion Theory, how cool is that?!) , its editor wrote many books on the subject.

As for Portuguese... well, if you know French grammar, I dare say Spanish and Portuguese will seem familiar to you. The devil is in details like different spelling and pronunciation and the fact that each language took some Latin roots and did its own thing with them, the results may be funny (there are, I'm sure, lists of Spanish and Italian words that seem rather similar yet mean different things).
Best wishes!

karinmollberg

1 year ago

svetosila

1 year ago

karinmollberg

1 year ago

svetosila

1 year ago

karinmollberg

1 year ago

svetosila

1 year ago

karinmollberg

10 months ago

svetosila

1 year ago

svetosila

1 year ago

karinmollberg

1 year ago

svetosila

1 year ago

Oh and I just saw a more than just pleasantly plump rather dark-skinned woman (from Eastern Ürop, I think) with chicken blonde GDR-hair walk by dressed in a Total Look of leopard print on very chintzy-shiny polyester; kind of an all-day pyjama from the Bulgarian or Roumanian variety of Пышка, maybe. One can only hope, it has the desired effect on her desired one! It definitely attracted attention at least, impossible to miss the gold-black animal print, what a looker she was, possibly spelt with an "h", even but then it would be too much in the Velben sense and not for pure love.
What can I say... It must be a Total Power Look (blonde hair and leopard print combined! A mankiller on the prowl!) Leopard print high boots would be a formidable addition. And a bag made of real fur.
I wonder... did people in DDR really seem more kitchy than the ones in BRD? I guess the disco style of th 1980s was awful everywhere.
It was Total Power let loose in the bright sunshine, she wore her leo-pyjama with black false leather ballerinas adorned with fake gold tassels, though. Probably an allusion to leopard paws with long, laquered nails or something.

People in the GDR looked less awful in the 1980s than their relatives in the West, simply because they didn´t have access to full aweso...fullness; so were saved, in a way the Regime may not have foreseen though one may easily describe the 1980s as decadent and a nadir of bad taste. I had my fun, then, but I kind of like trash and kitsch, depending on how it is done. The most awful varieties are always the ones where someone is trying to impress, it mostly goes so spectacularly wrong and that was much more common on the western side of the border but some people would also borrow cars and dress up to try and put down their East-German relatives, I kid you not. Trying to show off a wealth they didn´t even own, nothing more ridiculous.

svetosila

1 year ago