Barszczow A. N. (orpheus_samhain) wrote in linguaphiles,
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French: les articles

Could someone please tell me what is a difference between:

1. Je n'aime pas tes souliers, mais tu en as des autres.

and

2. Je n'aime pas tes souliers, mais tu en as les autres.

Are they both correct?
Tags: french
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  • 8 comments

snakeling

May 1 2014, 19:20:44 UTC 7 months ago

Neither is correct, sorry!

The correct version is "Je n'aime pas tes souliers, mais tu en as d'autres." (JSYK, "souliers" is an old-fashioned word that pretty much nobody uses nowadays. Use "chaussures" instead.)

If you wanted to use "les", you'd have to say "Je n'aime pas tes souliers, mais tu as les autres." Though the first way sounds more spontaneous to me. I would pretty much use the second way only if the person only had two pairs of shoes.

(Disclaimer: I'm from France, so what I say might be wrong for French spoken elsewhere.)

orpheus_samhain

May 1 2014, 19:36:20 UTC 7 months ago

Thank you!

muckefuck

May 2 2014, 03:14:43 UTC 7 months ago

I can't speak to other varieties, but souliers is still in common use in Louisiana French.

semisweetsoul

May 3 2014, 17:47:30 UTC 7 months ago

French from France speaking. My 76-year-old aunt still uses the word.

frenchroast

May 1 2014, 19:25:25 UTC 7 months ago Edited:  May 1 2014, 19:26:16 UTC

Honestly, my inclination would be to leave both "des" and/or "les" out of the above sentence. "d'autres" would be better, because of the presence of "en".

As for the difference between des and les, des is basically de+les.

orpheus_samhain

May 1 2014, 19:37:03 UTC 7 months ago

Thank you!

o_huallachain

May 1 2014, 20:06:27 UTC 7 months ago

"D'autres" would be better instead of both variants:)

xwingace

May 2 2014, 04:42:15 UTC 7 months ago Edited:  May 2 2014, 04:43:44 UTC

It seems to me to be the difference between the definite and indefinite article;

I don't like your shoes, but you have others
I don't like your shoes, but you have the others (presumably, that other pair they know you do like)

(Not anywhere *near* native French, though)

XWA

(Edit, yeah, ignore me. Listen to the natives :-))