Barszczow A. N. (orpheus_samhain) wrote in linguaphiles,
  • Mood: silly
  • Music: Nick Cave & The Bad Seeds "The Weeping Song"

FRENCH: The articles and professions

I've been told that with the names of professions (and nationalities and religions) you can use the indefinite articles or nothing, depending on the structure.

With personal pronoun there is no article, e.g.:

Il est acteur. (Il est français. Il est catholique.)

With c'est there is an indefinite article, e.g.:

C'est un acteur. (C'est un Français. C'est un catholique.)

My question is: if I use a personal pronoun and have an adjective next to a noun, do I put an indefinite article, or not? Does it depend on which one is first? E.g.:

1. Je suis chanteur. no article
2. Je suis [un?] chanteur célèbre. noun + adjective
3. Je suis [un?] excellent chanteur. adjective + noun
Tags: french
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  • 6 comments

dhampyresa

March 30 2014, 22:59:11 UTC 5 months ago

You put an article whereever the adjective goes:
Je suis chanteur.
Je suis un chanteur célèbre. (I guess you could get away with "Je suis chanteur célèbre" on the grounds that "chanteur célèbre" works as one entity in this case.)
Je suis un excellent chanteur.

orpheus_samhain

March 31 2014, 04:34:59 UTC 5 months ago

Thank you!

snakeling

April 1 2014, 18:28:28 UTC 5 months ago

(I guess you could get away with "Je suis chanteur célèbre" on the grounds that "chanteur célèbre" works as one entity in this case.)

Nope. It's still a noun + an adjective, so you use an article with it.

dhampyresa

April 1 2014, 22:56:45 UTC 5 months ago

A l'oral ça me choquerais pas, mais j'avoue qu"à l'écrit ça fait bizarre.

hkitsune

March 30 2014, 23:29:11 UTC 5 months ago

The reason you include an article, I believe, is because adding an adjective specifies you as a member of a group, so you need to point out that you are just one of those people.

orpheus_samhain

March 31 2014, 04:36:23 UTC 5 months ago

That's what I've been told, but this opposition of il est/c'est confused me. I didn't know which rule is stronger :) Thank you!