Samuel Ekeme N'Diba (ekeme_ndiba) wrote in linguaphiles,
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Een oude nederlandse briefkaart

Can anyone decipher the Dutch part of the text below (I can only understand cordial greetings and the request for Hubert's address in Rome)?

briefkaart

I also wonder if it was a common practice to send replies on the same card (see Mr Hubert de Goede's Italian text and Italian stamp).
Tags: dutch
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  • 8 comments

orange_fell

January 19 2014, 20:24:38 UTC 9 months ago

The Italian stamp is actually a "postage due." 12.5 Dutch cents were not enough to pay for the services used to deliver the postcard, so Mr. de Goede had to pay 30 Italian centimes on receipt.

http://www.italianstamps.co.uk/kingdom/pdue/

ekeme_ndiba

January 19 2014, 20:31:40 UTC 9 months ago

Thanks a lot!

varsan

January 19 2014, 20:35:23 UTC 9 months ago

Dear Hubert. Receive(?) our warmest regards. It is Christmas today here. ... are camping here. Write your address in Rome....[cannot decipher the last 2 lines of the handwriting]

ekeme_ndiba

January 19 2014, 20:44:20 UTC 9 months ago

Do you really think it's 'Kerstmis', not 'Kermis'? The postmark says 'the 22nd of June'.

xwingace

January 19 2014, 20:50:02 UTC 9 months ago

Looks like 'Kermis' to me. And it also looks like 'Wim' is camping.

XWA

books2thesky

January 20 2014, 07:57:55 UTC 9 months ago

I don't know Dutch so I can't help with your question, but looking at the postcard, it actually seems to me that the partly-Italian text in purple was written on the sender's end, because it looks like it was written before the Dutch text in black. The last line and signature of the Dutch text are crowded together and slanting upwards, as if the writer was trying to avoid writing over the purple text at the bottom.

Judging by the handwriting and the fact that it seems to be in crayon, I might guess (although I have no evidence for this, it's just a wild guess) that the sender had a child, and that, because the postcard was going to Italy, the child decided to write the small amount of Italian that he/she knew: the phrases "buon giorno," "buon viagge," and "molta felicità." And another, even wilder guess: It says "Tante Marie" at the top; perhaps Aunt Marie was the wife of Hubert?

moonplanet

January 20 2014, 12:58:09 UTC 9 months ago

This is what I can decipher:

Beste Hubert. Ontvang onze hartelijke groeten. 't Is heden Kermis hier. Wim is aan 't kampeeren. Schrijf juist adres van je in Rome. Gegroet geliefte Pa ...
Dag Hubert. Tot ziens.
Je liefhebbende al... Piet

ekeme_ndiba

January 20 2014, 19:06:02 UTC 9 months ago

Vriendelijk bedankt!