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Back January 2nd, 2013 Forward
Nyxelestia [userpic]

I'm re-learning Spanish during this Winter Break, and I'm a little stumped on just how to do it, so I'm looking for some new ideas.

The standard ways to learn/practice a language seem to be things like flashcards (bane of my existence right there, me and flashcards have never gotten along) or watching TV shows in Spanish (most of the Spanish TV shows I've watched bore me to tears, most likely because most TV shows in general bore me to tears). Most of the other 'typical' ways to learn a language aren't much better. The most interesting one I've heard so far is to just translate something into your language of choice, then have a native speaker (or reader) look over it to point out mistakes or where you can make improvements.

What are some other ways you guys have taught yourself languages? What are some of the more unusual or weird ways? ¡Ayúdame, Obi Wan-Kenobi linguaphiles, tú eres mi única esperanza!

narcissus1 [userpic]

I stumbled across this interesting article the other day, about how English might actually be a Scandinavian language and not a West Germanic language. According to this theory, Middle English and Old English are not directly related. When the Scandinavians arrived their language stuck, with the Scandinavian languages borrowing from Old English instead of the other way around, forming Middle English as Old English died out.

I wonder if any of you have come across similar theories before, because it's totally new to me. Unfortunately I've forgotten too sizeable a chunk of the History of the English Language course I took many semesters ago to really weigh in on this, but this theory has certainly piqued my curiosity.

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Back January 2nd, 2013 Forward